Best Toshiba Microwaves

Best Toshiba Microwave

Toshiba’s microwave was introduced in 1985. Its name comes from the company’s founder, Mr. Toshiaki Tosaka. The company made its first commercial microwave in 1992 and it became popular among Japanese households due to its low price and high efficiency. The most notable feature of the toshiba microwave is its size: it measures only 8 inches wide by 12 inches long by 4 feet tall (2 meters x 3 meters x 1 meter).

The toshiba microwave is a very simple design. It consists of two metal plates with insulating material between them. A magnet inside the refrigerator connects the two plates and turns on or off the power when one plate is placed near another. When a person sits down at one end of the table, the other side automatically switches on and starts cooking food. To use it, all you need are your hands and some kitchen utensils.

To achieve maximum efficiency, the toshiba microwave uses a series of electromagnetic waves to heat water in a pot. These waves travel through the air and are reflected back into the microwave. The microwaves then pass through a filter so they don’t damage anything else around them. The microwaves are powerful enough to cook food even if there isn’t much room at the table; however, they aren’t strong enough to cook foods that require lots of time like meat or fish. For these types of foods, users need to wait for their food to be reheated before they can eat them.

Best Toshiba Microwaves

A favorite cartoon from one time was the Road Runner. In some episodes, Wyle E. Coyote wanted something very badly: a case of explosive that would destroy the Roadrunner for example. Unfortunately, Acme Corporation which sold the explosive was out of stock.

Do you think they will be getting any more in?”

Mr. Coyote asks.

“Nope,” says the clerk. “They are all out.”

Best Toshiba Microwaves - Image

“Oh dear, I guess I’ll have to try elsewhere,” laments Mr. Coyote.

The next scene shows a large screen with the Acme Corporation logo on it. The screen reads, “ACME Corporation. No Goods. Stock Out Forever.”

This was in the 1950’s or 1960’s and believe it or not some of the audience did not know what “out of stock forever” meant. In fact, several of them wrote angry letters to the television station saying they will never watch that channel again. What terrible affront to their intelligence!

My friends and I fell about laughing every time we saw that scene. What idiots we were.

Since then we have all learned that foreign words can be confusing to some people in some circumstances. For example, in the late 1980’s a big fuss was made about the word “alienate” when it was used in an English test for prospective immigrants. The correct answer was (d), all of the above because it means to make someone feel unwelcome. The wrong answers were (a), (b) and (c).

But people complained to the newspapers saying, “How can I be all of the above?

I’m not a building!” The newspapers, as usual, blew the whole thing out of proportion and made it look like thousands of people did not know the meaning of the word.

Nowadays, everyone uses (d) all of the above anyway so what was the point of the question?

Sources & references used in this article:

Microwaves in nanoparticle synthesis: fundamentals and applications by S Horikoshi, N Serpone – 2013 – books.google.com

Radial waveguide systems and methods for post-match control of microwaves by S Kobayashi, S Park, D Lubomirsky, H Sugai – US Patent 9,299,537, 2016 – Google Patents

Radial waveguide systems and methods for post-match control of microwaves by S Kobayashi, S Park, D Lubomirsky – US Patent 9,299,538, 2016 – Google Patents

Radial waveguide systems and methods for post-match control of microwaves by S Kobayashi, S Park, D Lubomirsky, H Sugai – US Patent 9,564,296, 2017 – Google Patents

Radial waveguide systems and methods for post-match control of microwaves by S Kobayashi, S Park, D Lubomirsky, H Sugai – US Patent 9,837,249, 2017 – Google Patents

Microwaves in organic and organometallic synthesis by R Gedye, F Smith, K Westaway – Journal of microwave power and …, 1991 – Taylor & Francis

Process for the treatment of cellulosic materials with oxidizing agents and microwaves by J Hageman, L Plumet, M Robberechts – US Patent 4,576,609, 1986 – Google Patents