Best Kids’ Water Tables

Best Kids’ Water Tables: What are they?

The best water tables are those that provide clean, clear water with no harmful chemicals or contaminants. They must not only have a good quality of water but also be free from pollution. There are many types of water tables, some of which include:

1) Rainwater Harvesting Water Table – This type of water table collects rainwater runoff and stores it until needed.

It is safe to drink because there are no chemicals added to it.

2) Spill & Splash Seaway Water Table – This type of water table collects water from the seaways and stores it until needed.

It does not contain any pollutants and is considered very pure.

3) Target Water Table – This type of water table contains clean, clear water that meets all safety requirements for drinking purposes.

It is safe to use and is used for irrigation.

4) Pool Water Table – This type of water table is made up of pool water that has been treated to remove chlorine, chloramines, fluoride and other chemical compounds.

5) Sewer Water Table – This type of water table collects sewage sludge and stores it until needed.

It does not contain any pollutants or chemicals and is considered very clean.

Water pollution

Water pollution is defined as the presence of harmful, dangerous, and unwanted substances in water. Water pollution is caused by human activities. The major sources of water pollution include:

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1) Discharge of waste – Waste from industries, businesses, farms, homes and municipalities gets discharged into rivers and other water bodies.

This not only adds to water pollution but also degrades the quality of water available for human use.

2) Runoff of pesticides and fertilizers – Fertilizers and pesticides applied to farmlands get washed away during heavy rains into nearby rivers and other water bodies.

3) Leakage of sewage – Old, damaged and poorly constructed sewage pipes fail to retain the sewage inside them, allowing it to get into nearby rivers and other water bodies.

4) Discharge of oil, gas and other chemicals – Oil rigs, gas refineries, shipping ports and chemical plants discharge toxic substances like oil, gas and chemicals into nearby water bodies.

5) Fire retardant chemicals – Chemicals used for fire retardation by the forestry industry gets washed away by rain and springs into nearby water bodies.

6) Urban waste runoff – Excessive development in urban areas leads to the construction of roads, buildings, parking lots etc.

This activity prevents rainwater from percolating into the soil and leads to runoff of polluted urban waste water into nearby water bodies.

7) Release of toxic chemicals – Some people still dump hazardous, toxic and radioactive chemicals into nearby rivers and other water sources.

Water treatment methods

The most common methods of treating water include:

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1) Filtration using sand and gravel – Water filters containing sand and gravel remove most pathogens from water.

2) Filtration using charcoal – Water filters containing charcoal remove chemicals and odor from water.

3) Filtration using membranes – Water filters containing membranes filter out viruses, bacteria and protozoa from water.

4) Disinfection using chlorine – Chlorine is added to water to kill most pathogens that may be present in water.

5) Disinfection using ultraviolet radiation – Ultraviolet radiation kills most pathogens that may be present in water.

6) Desalination – Water is distilled from salt water.

This method is not very common due to the high energy requirements for the distillation process.

Water purification process

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The process of water purification involves the following steps:

1) Pre-treatment – The first step involves pre-treatment of water, which deals with the removal of large particles and debris from water.

Sand, anthracite and various kinds of filters are used for this purpose.

2) Coagulation – In this step, chemicals like alum and ferric chloride are used to make particles clump together so that they can be easily filtered.

3) Flocculation – In this step, chlorine is added to break down the particles that have already been clumped together.

This process is also known as chlorination.

Sources & references used in this article:

Watching parents, watching kids: Water safety supervision of young children at the beach by K Moran – International Journal of Aquatic Research and …, 2010 – scholarworks.bgsu.edu

“Playing with kids all day”: Job stress in early childhood education by MC Hyson – Young Children, 1982 – JSTOR

General Essays by …, G Bachelorarbeit, EB Friends, IWPYT Do, GCM Table… – vs.edu.mk

Best management practices to enhance water quality: who is adopting them? by B Robinson – 1983 – Samuel French, Inc.